Multiple Choose Multiple Answer Real Exam Questions 20

Multiple Choose Multiple Answer Real Exam Questions 20

# Multiple Choose Multiple Answer Real Exam Questions 20

Read the text and answer the multiple-choice question by selecting the correct response. More than one answer is correct.

1.) The Western alphabet, which is used in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand as well as in other countries, originated in the Middle East. The people who gave the world this alphabet were the Phoenicians, a people who established colonies all over the Mediterranean, including Carthage in Africa and Gades in Spain. In their alphabet, the letters were represented by little pictures which represented sounds. The Phoenician A was Aleph, which means “bull” and it was made from a little picture of a bull’s head. The letter B was Beth which meant the house, and showed the round-roofed buildings which you can still see today in Syria.

The Phoenicians had contact with another nation of sailors, the Greeks, with whom they fought and traded. The Greeks also started to use the Phoenician alphabet. They changed the names so aleph and beth became alpha and beta. The shapes of the letters are the same but they have been turned sideways. of course, the first two letters of the alphabet give it its name.

Over the years there have been changes. Latin developed an alphabet give it its name. Over the years there have been changes. Latin developed an alphabet with some different letters to the Greeks. and other letters have been added since. But really westerners are using the same system of writing which has served them so well for thousands of years.

Question: Which of the following are true statements in accordance with the information given in the above passage?

a. The purpose of this text is to tell something of the Phoenician history.

b. The Greeks turned the letters in a different direction.

c. The Phoenicians came from Carthage.

d. The Phoenicians alphabet was composed of individual signs.

e. Our modern system of writing is similar to the Phoenician alphabet.


2.)  In terrestrial affairs we think of “big” as being complicated; a city is more intricate than a village, an ocean more complicated than a puddle. For the universe, the reverse seems to be the case bigger is simpler Galaxies have some puzzling features, but on the whole, they are scarcely more complicated than the stars that compose them Beyond the galaxies, in the hierarchy of the cosmos, there are clusters of galaxies; these clusters are loosely bound by the gravity of their largest members and tend to look very much the same in all directions.

Simplest of all is the universe at large, it is far less complicated than the Earth, one of its most trivial members. The universe consists of billions of galaxies flying apart as it from an explosion that set it in motion, it is not lopsided, nor does it rotate. The more thoroughly scientists investigate the universe, the more clearly its simplicity shines through.

Question: Which of the following statements can be supported by the text?

a. The universe is a relatively simple phenomenon.

b. Billions of galaxies are predicted to explode, adding to the universal complexity.

c. Galaxy clusters are an illusion.

d. Clusters of galaxies are held together by gravity.


3.) Given the record of our political class, the proposal to give tax rebates for political donations will likely meet a similar fate. Instead of cleaning up political life then, the bill runs the risk of being a godsend for fly-by-night middlemen and fixers, and unscrupulous businessmen. The other objection to the bill is a more traditional one, namely that rather than private donations, the solution is in state funding of parties. This not only ensures that there is some sense of proportion and there is some sense of proportion and fairness in the quantum of funding available to different parties, but also that funding does not become a means of determining the political agenda.

Private funding, in this argument, is an unacceptable form of political lobbying which promotes the specific demands of donors apart from generally favoring conservative, mainstream parties, squeezing out those representing minority voices. Whatever its merits, the most serious obstacle to this kind of reasoning comes from the precarious nature of public finance in the country.

At a time when the Indian state is already hard-pressed to find resources for education, health, and other social security activities, can there be a case for it to burden itself with a new category of expenses? In purely economic terms too, the proposed tax breaks do not augur well for the savings sector; and this when the sagging savings graph in the economy is already a matter of increasing anxiety.

Question: Which demands according to the writer of the passage deserve better attention than the political funds?

a. To provide better education opportunities to the citizens.

b. Serving the health-related requirements of the people.

c. Educational donations to institutions.

d. Taking care of the safety and security of the citizens.

e. The funds for the proper functioning of transport systems.


4.) There is a part of Spain’s sun-baked Andalucia that is extraordinary not only because of its unspoiled terrain and authentic Spanish traditions but also because of its caves. These are not dark, damp holes, with dripping water and evil smells. They are residences, ancient Bronze Age dwellings now being refurbished for hundreds of 21st century Spaniards. In Galera, the region’s most important village, it’s estimated that there are at least 1,000 such habitations carved into its hillsides. “we take old caves, renovate them, then sell them on,” says Rob Oakley, office manager of the leading developer Galera enterprises. “Our company was set up by someone who discovered the area of Galera when it was just a tourist attraction 15 years ago and saw its potential.” The ancient abodes are transformed from rough caves into amenities like electricity and sewage,  phone lines, running hot water, even internet connections.

Question: Which of the following words in the passages have the same meaning at residences?

a. adobes

b. amenities

c. connections

d. dwellings

e. habitations

f. hillsides


Answers

Question 1:- b. The Greeks turned the letters in a different direction.

e. Our modern system of writing is similar to the Phoenician alphabet.

Question 2:- a. The universe is a relatively simple phenomenon.

d. Clusters of galaxies are held together by gravity.

Question 3:- a. To provide better education opportunities to the citizens.

b. Serving the health-related requirements of the people.

d. Taking care of the safety and security of the citizens.

Question 4:- a. adobes

d. dwellings

e. habitations


These samples are for your practice and can get higher scores. And these samples are provided by students who appeared in the exam in previous dates. So, you can also share your exam experiences and questions as well. Thank you.

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