Stella Franklin reading fill blanks PTE difficult questions 101

Stella Franklin reading fill blanks PTE difficult questions 101 secret river

# Stella Franklin reading fill blanks PTE difficult questions 101

Read the following paragraph and choose the correct option to fill the gaps.

1.) Sample

an changed retreated more suffer the altered much suffered

Downward flow heightened Stella Franklin’s pride and self-awareness and contributed ……………………… to the making of Miles Franklin, nationalist, feminist and novelist. She readily appreciated her father‘s loss; shared hardships ………………………… especially by her more vigorous mother, and surmounted her educational deprivations proving after that an enterprising aspirant to literature. Her bush-bred talents were fostered by Charles Blyth, tutor at Brindabella, Thomas Hebblewhite of the Goulburn Evening Penny Post, and after governessing near Yass in 1897, the example of Charlotte Bronte. Writing, rather than teaching, nursing, and Edward O’Sullivan’s testimonials, delivered independence.

Completed by 1899, her marvellously rebellious My Brilliant Career, rejected locally and published with the aid of Henry Lawson by William Blackwood & Sons, Australia, and Canada, in 1901, brought instant acclaim. The ambiguities of publication were soon impressed on …………………. otherwise resourceless 22-year-old female. As translated into the contemporaneous My Career Goes Bung (unpublished until 1946), the self-styled ‘Bushwacker’ ……………………. from rural repute and social-cum-sexual patronage in Sydney, including Banjo Paterson’s sporting offer of collaboration in 1902.

She struggled towards a literary niche, sheltered by the O’Sullivans and from 1902 Miss Rose Scott, who introduced her to sophisticated feminist circles. For a year in 1903-04, ………………………… as ‘Sarah Franklin’, she worked in domestic service in Sydney and Melbourne soliciting literary material. In Melbourne, she met Joseph Furphy, a mutual and perpetual inspiration, Kate Baker and the Goldstein women who encouraged her to Christian Science and, more effectively, emigration.


2.) Sample

moments many more things apparently clearly unmatched

What is a Helen Garner case, to Helen Garner? “I’m interested in ………………………… ordinary people who suddenly snap and do ……………………. that are terrible,” she says slowly, “but are just an exploded version of anything ordinary people secretly fantasize about in ……………………of great rage or stress. I am interested in people whose self-restraint suddenly stops working.”

Why would a father kill his children? Why would someone kill their boyfriend? Would she? Would you? Her eye for telling observations is ……………………. and relentless; one friend recalls her pushing to the front of a funeral and whipping out her notebook to record the minutiae of a Jewish ceremony.

Garner, in person, seems smaller than her towering reputation might suggest, but she simmers with energy: over the’ times’ journalists have portrayed her as “a grouchy literary lioness”. When we meet, she appears ………………….. like a magpie (ruthless, intelligent, an appetite for shiny details) and not grouchy at all, although, at 75, her temper may have weathered with time.


3.) Sample

short start among between disrupted long began

After moving to Colorado, Grenville began teaching, and with The Writing Book: A Workbook for Fiction Writers (1990), she ……………………… publishing books about her craft. In 1994 she returned to the subject matter of Lilian’s Story with Albion’s Story (also published as Dark Places), a savage portrait of Lilian’s father told in his own words. Grenville achieved major international success with The Idea of Perfection (1999), a story of the growing attraction …………………. recent divorcé and a woman whose third marriage ended with her husband’s suicide, two outsiders thrown together in a small town in the Australian bush. The best-selling novel—which also explored issues facing contemporary rural Australia, among them economic development, historical preservation, and tourism—won Britain’s 2001 Orange Prize for Fiction

In 2006 Grenville captured the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and earned a place on the …………………….. list of Man Booker Prize nominees with The Secret River (2005). Set in the early 19th century, it traces the life of an impoverished Englishman—William Thornhill, a waterman on the Thames—who is convicted of theft and transported to Australia. Accompanied by his wife, he is eventually pardoned and seeks to settle a plot of land. His plan to work “his” corner of Australia is soon ………………………., however, by those who already occupy the land: the Darug, an Aboriginal people. Grenville’s next novel, The Lieutenant(2008), is set in 18th-century New South Wales and centres on a member of the British fleet. Sarah Thornhill (2011), a sequel to The Secret River, follows the youngest child of William. Grenville also wrote such nonfiction books as Searching for the Secret River (2006) and One Life: My Mother’s Story (2015).


4.) Sample

regularly job worked a hired usually relationships

In 2013 Flanagan released The Narrow Road to the Deep North, which was based in part on the experience of Flanagan’s father as a prisoner of war during World War II. The novel was acclaimed for its brutally stark narrative of life as a prisoner and slave labourer as well as for its gripping examination of individual lives, personal ………………………, and conflict that, despite taking place in a historical setting, was lauded as being relevant in modern times. The work was a labour of love for Flanagan, one that took him more than a decade to complete to his satisfaction: he reportedly discarded five drafts of the novel before submitting the final version. The Narrow Road to the Deep North received various honours, notably the Man Booker Prize. Flanagan’s next novel, First Person (2017), concerns a struggling writer who is ……………………… to ghostwrite a conman’s memoir.

In addition to his novels, Flanagan published essays and historical nonfiction, notably “Parish-Fed Bastards”: A History of the Politics of the Unemployed in Britain, 1884–1939 (1991) and Codename Iago: The Story of John Friedrich (1991, with Friedrich), an account of Australia’s most infamous conman. Notes on an Exodus (2016) was an essay about Syrian refugees, with illustrations by Ben Quilty. Flanagan was also …………………… respected journalist; his articles appeared …………………………. in The New Yorker magazine and the Paris newspaper Le Monde. He also directed the film adaptation of The Sound of One Hand Clapping (1998) and was one of the writers who ………………. on the screenplay for the epic Australia (2008), directed by Baz Luhrmann.


5.) Sample

It’s the end of the road for Tim Winton. This is his last interview, after two months in Australia promoting his 29th book, The Shepherd’s Hut, and flying ……………………… the country for a sold-out speaking tour about …………………….. masculinity. The night before our meeting in Melbourne, he was in Sydney for the premiere of Breath, a movie version of his coming-of-age surfing novel directed by the actor Simon Baker. Tomorrow he’s going home at last, to a …………………… town he prefers not to name in interviews, two hours north of Perth.

Winton is gracious with his time, given his exhaustion and that he really doesn’t like the publicity circuit. He is protective of his life ……………………. from being Tim Winton, four-time winner of Australia’s most prominent literary award, the Miles Franklin. By literary standards, he is astonishingly popular, a writer of dark fiction who gets asked for autographs on the street.

“You’re the only thing that’s standing between me and freedom,” he says with a smile, describing himself as a horse in a paddock waiting to go home: “Any fence I can’t jump I’m just going to run …………………………”


Answers:

1.) much, suffered, an, retreated, altered

2.) apparently, things, moments, unmatched, more

3.) began, between, short, disrupted

4.) relationships, hired, a, regularly, worked

5.) around, toxic, tiny, away, through


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