cow and grass Australian Education Summary text 3

cow and grass Australian Education Summary text 3

cow and grass Australian Education Summary text 3

 Summary written text

1. Cow and Grass

The co-evolutionary relationship between cows and grass is one of nature’s underappreciated wonders: it also happens to be the key to understanding just about everything about modern meat. For the grasses, which have evolved to withstand the grazing of ruminants, the cow maintains and expands their habitat by preventing trees and shrubs from gaining a foothold and hogging the sunlight; the animal also spreads grass see, plants it with his hooves, and then fertilizes it with his manure. In exchange for these services, the grasses offer ruminants a plentiful and exclusive supply of lunch. For cows (like sheep, bison and other ruminants) have evolved the special ability to convert grass-which single-stomached creatures like us can’t digest-into high-quality protein. they can do this because they possess what is surely the most highly evolved digestive organ in nature: the rum-en. About the size of a medicine ball, the organ is essentially a forty-five-gallon fermentation tank in which a resident population of bacteria dines on grass. Living their unseen lives at the far end of the food chain that culminates in a hamburger, these bacteria have, just like the grasses co-evolved with the cow, whom they feed. Truly this is an excellent system for all concerned : for the grasses, for the bacteria, for the animals, and for us, the animal eaters.

There is co-evolutionary relationship between cows and grass as the cows’ which is one of the ruminants that has rum-en to digest the grass into high quality protein even though the grasses already evolved to against the grazing of ruminants’ can help the grass spread seed by their hooves and also provide manure to it.

 Answer:

There is a co-evolutionary relationship among cows, grass and bacteria as cows have rum-en where bacteria could digest grass into high quality protein while they help the grass spread seed by their hooves and also provide manure to it.

2. Australian Education

When Australians engage in debate about educational quality or equity, they often seem to accept that a country cannot achieve both at the same time. The lecture will present compelling international evidence that there are countries which do, through Australia is not among them.

Curriculum reforms intended to improve equity often fail to do so because they increase breadth or differentiation in offerings in a way that increases differences in quality. Further, these differences in quality often reflect differences in students, social backgrounds because the ‘new’ offerings are typically taken up by relatively disadvantaged students who are not served well by them. Evidence from New South Wales will be used to illustrate this point. The need to improve the quality of education is well accepted across OCED and other countries as they seek to strengthen their human capital to underpin their modern, knowledge economies. Improved equity is also important for this purpose since the demand for high-level skills is widespread and the opportunities for the low-skilled are diminishing.

Improved equity in education system seems primarily to reproduce existing social arrangements, conferring privilege where it already exists and denying it where it does not. Even in countries where the diagnosis might be less extreme, the capacity of schooling to build social cohesion is often diminished by the way in which schools separate individuals and groups.

Answer:

Although improved educational equity increases differences in quality so that educational equity and quality can’t be achieved at the same time, improved educational equity and quality are still important because they could strengthen human capital and social cohesion.

 

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