Kate Grenville reading fill blanks practice 103

Kate Grenville reading fill blanks practice 103

# Kate Grenville reading fill blanks practice 103

Read the following paragraph and choose the correct option to fill the gaps.

1.) Sample

editing against opposition different examine creative different

Kate Grenville, (born October 14, 1950, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia), Australian novelist whose works of historical fiction ……………………………. class, race, and gender in colonial and contemporary Australia.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in literature (1972) from the University of Sydney, Grenville began working as a film editor, writer, and script consultant. In the late 1970s, she held various jobs in London and Paris and then went to the United States, where she received a master’s degree in …………………………. writing (1982) from the University of Colorado. Two years later she published her first book, Bearded Ladies, a collection of short stories that explored gender, power, and Australian national identity, all of which would remain central to Grenville’s later work.

Lilian’s Story (1984), her first published novel, and Dreamhouse (1986) both examined women struggling …………………….. oppressive situations: Lilian Singer is a woman abused by her father, and Louise Dufrey is a wife facing a disintegrating marriage. Joan Makes History (1988) considers the subject of Australian history and identity through the story of Joan, born in 1901, the year of Australia’s federation. As Joan moves through her life, she imagines a multiplicity of other Joans present at ……………………….. moments in Australia’s history, a device that allowed Grenville to sift the intersections of personal and “official” history.


2.) Sample

attention typical large conflict some creative innovative free spare

Franklin’s responsibilities grew steadily: in 1908 she was, unofficially, part-time secretary to the league, from 1910 secretary at a salary of $25 a week, in 1912 unofficially assistant editor to Alice Henry on its monthly journal, Life and Labor, in 1913-14 co-editor and, briefly, editor in 1915. In her limited ……………………. time, she took singing and piano lessons. Something of those dynamic years on Dearborn Street, Chicago, may be gleaned from her little-known romance,

The Net of Circumstance, published in London in 1915 under her pseudonym ‘Mr. and Mrs Ogniblat L’Artsau’. Of feminist and biographical significance, it was her only American-based ……………………. work to be published. Miles Franklin now had two careers, both pursued full-pelt. Her ever-worrying health collapsed in 1912, shortly after her first visit in 1911 to England and France. Then in her early thirties, she redoubled her literary and political efforts. But she was increasingly unsettled, partly by the ………………. of bright young men.

Declaration of World War I in Europe clarified …………………. things for Franklin: she finally rejected marriage, which she considered ‘rabbit’ work and, unnerved by American chauvinism, she reasserted her nationality. Faced by mounting ideological or personal ………………………….. within the league, she took three months to leave and sailed for England on 30 October 1915, vaguely envisaging war-work. From London she resigned, severing links with Chicago, although not her many friendships or affection for America.


3.) Sample

talk apparent inserting always forms fact language different

Never just an observer in her stories, Garner is …………………….. in there, talking to grieving families, chasing gruff police officers, scrutinizing showy barristers. Critics have accused her of ………………………. too much of herself into her books; in contrast, she sees it as a courtesy. “I think I am trying to take their story into me, give it my full psychological, human attention, from the depths of myself, as best I can, to give full value to the people in the story, to respect it and respect their dignity. And do it in the ………………………. of literature, a bloodstained language, one of violent emotion. There are ways to render these things without repulsive, sentimental language, the sort you read in the trashy pulp.”

The French have a term for what Garner writes: récit, where the narration draws attention to itself. English-speaking critics, on the other hand, have been more preoccupied – and divided – by her blend of ……………………….. and fiction. “I think I do stump people,” she muses. “Maybe they just don’t like it, that’s OK. Australians seem to be particularly exercised by matters of genre. They just cannot stand it if it is not clear. They fear being taken for a ride.”

Just as her subjects are forced to admit their worst, Garner subjects herself to brutal scrutiny. When confronted with her mother’s Alzheimer’s, she writes in The Feel of Steel: “It’s all I can do not to smother her with a pillow, or tip her out of the wheelchair into the lake and hold her head under with my boot.”


4.) Sample

make things universal important yet large make

FremantleMedia’s director of drama, Jo Porter, said the Deep North was a compelling ………………………. story made for television. “Rich with insights on the human condition, it is ripe for screen adaptation with huge visual potential and scale,” Porter said. “At its core is an achingly powerful examination of the ………………… forms of love, forged through the crucible of war.” FremantleMedia’s production of Picnic at Hanging Rock for Foxtel and Amazon Prime will have its world television premiere on 6 May on Foxtel. No broadcaster is …………………………. attached to this project, a spokesman for FremantleMedia said.

First published in 2013, Deep North sold more than a million copies in 42 countries and is a bestseller in the UK, Australia, and the US. Winning the Booker changed Flanagan’s life as he had run out of money and was going to work in the mines to …………………….. a living.

“A year and a half ago, when I finished this book, I was contemplating going to get what work I could in the mines in far northern Australia because ……………………………… had come to such a pass with my writing,” Flanagan said when he won. “I had spent so long on this book.”


5.) Sample

modelled cancer sense chosen small field big

His antihero is Jaxie Clackton, barely 15, raised amid violence and indifference in a …………………… town in Western Australia. His father – “Captain Wankbag” as Jaxie calls him – is physically and verbally violent towards the boy and his mother. Every man in Jaxie’s life has …………………….. a deformed version of masculinity; its violence, self-hatred, harshness, and its contempt for women. Jaxie is profane, casually sexist and racist, and he bullies kids at school. He is the “fruit of misogyny”, says Winton.

Jaxie’s mother has died from ……………………… and, when his father dies in a gruesome way, the damaged adolescent starts walking north, surviving for a time on his own. Only when he meets ex-priest Fintan MacGillis, living alone on the barren salt plains of Western Australia, does he ………………………… the possibility of another way to live, a glimpse of humanity and decency?

Winton’s themes often revolve around damaged men and yearning boys but this time he has ………………………. to address it explicitly. “The thing that’s achingly obvious is that men aren’t really stepping up and lifting their end of the log,” he says of the pervasiveness of systemic misogyny. “I’m not an expert. I’m not in the sociological ……………………… and I haven’t got a PhD in gender studies. I was offering up a few observations, thinking aloud, really.”


Answers:

1.) examine, creative, against, different

2.) spare, creative, attention, some, conflict

3.) always, inserting, language, fact

4.) universal, many, yet, make, things

5.) small, modelled, cancer, sense, chosen, field

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