Multiple choice questions with multiple answers reading 9

Multiple choice questions with multiple answers 9

Multiple choice questions with multiple answers reading 9

Read the text and answer the multiple Choice question by selecting all the correct responses . More than one response is correct.

1.) Now, Osvanny Ramos of the Ecole Normale Superieure in Lyon, France and colleagues say prediction is possible after all. They designed an experiment that induced avalanches in a two dimensionable of 4 milli metre diameter steel beads. They placed a 60 centimeter row of randomly spaced beards between two parallel, vertical glass plates 4.5 millimetres apart, with the beads glued to the bottom to simulate the ground under a natural pile. Then they dropped in one bead at a time, creating piles of up to 55,000 beads.

After each drop, the team photographed the pile and measured the position of each bead to calculate the “space factor” – a measure of the disorder in the system, which was relalted to the space surrounding each bead. the greater the disorder round a bead, the more likely an avalanche was. If one or more beads moved when a new bead fell on the pile, that was considered to be an avalanche. An extra large avalanche involved between 317 and 1000 beads.

Multiple choice questions

The researchers found that if the space factor before a bead dropped was greater than it had been 50 steps earlier, they could predict an extra large avalanche with 64 per cent accuracy. Ramos says that they can improve the odds by analysing more information, such as the size of the pile. The work could also have important consequences for predicting earthquake. Ramos has an inkling why forecasting earthquakes is so difficult seismologist tend to use information about the time and size of events known as a time series. However, Ramos found that this didn’t help predict the next big avalanche. “When seismologists try to predict earthquake, they analyse the time series, “he says. He argues that they would have more success analysing data analogous to the internal disorder in the pile of beads.

Question: What is the correct answer?

a. Space factor is related to the space around each bead, and the greater disorder indicates a higher possibility of avalanche.

b. The greater the disorder around a bead, the less likely an avalanche was.

c. Internal disorder analysis will lead to a more successful model.

d. They could 100% accurately predict an extra large avalanche based on the change in space factor of a bead.

e. Forecasting earthquakes is easier than predicting avalanche.

 


Multiple choice questions

2. September 2, 1752 was great day in the history of asleep. That Wednesday evening, millions of British subjects in England and the colonies went peacefully to sleep and did not wake up until twelve days later, Behind this feat of nareoleptic prowess was not some revolutionary  hypnotic technique or miraculous pharmaceutical discovered in the West Indies. It was rather the British Calendar Act of 1751, which declared one day after Wednesday the second to be Thursday the fourteenth.

Prior to that cataleptic September evening. the official British calendar differed from that of continental Europe by election days that is September 2 in London was September 13 in Paris, Lison and Berlin. The discrepancy had sprung from Britain continued use of the Julian calendar, which had been the official calendar of Europe since its invention by Julius Casesar in 45 B.C, until the dcree of Pope Gregory 13 in 1582.

Caesar’s calendar which consisted of eleven months of 30 or 31 days and 28 day February was actually quite accurate, it erred from the real solar calendar by only 11.5 minutes a year. After centuries, though even a small inaccuracy like this adds up. By the sixteenth century, it ahad pit the Julian calendar behind the solar one by 10 days.

In 1582, Pope Gregory 13 ordered the advancement of the calendar by 10 days and introduced a new corrective device to curb further error: century years such as 1700 or 1800 would no longer be counted as leap years, unless they were divisible by 400

Multiple choice questions

Question: What factors were involved in the disparity between the calendars of Britain and Europe in the 17th century?

a. The provisions of the British Calendar Act of 1751

b. Britain’s continued use of Julian calendar

c. The accrual of very minor differences between the calendar used in Britain and real solar events

d. The failure to include years divisible by four as leap years

e. the decree of Pope Gregory 13

f. revolutionary ideas which had emerged from the West Indies

g. Britains’s use of a calendar consisting of twelve months rather than eleven

 


Answer:

Question 1:  a. Space factor is related to the space around each bead, and the greater disorder indicates a higher possibility of avalanche.

                    c. Internal disorder analysis will lead to a more successful model.

Question 2:  b. Britain’s continued use of Julian calendar

                    c. The accrual of very minor differences between the calendar used in Britain and real solar events

                     e. the decree of Pope Gregory 13


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