Richard Flanagan PTE reading fill blanks difficult 104 novel

Richard Flanagan PTE reading fill blanks difficult 104

# Richard Flanagan PTE reading fill blanks difficult 104

Read the following paragraph and choose the correct option to fill the gaps.

1.) Sample

renowned known during past who clear set respected awarded

Richard Flanagan, in full Richard Miller Flanagan, (born 1961, Longford, Tasmania, Australia), an Australian writer …………………… was ………………….. for a series of critically acclaimed works. He was widely considered “the finest Australian novelist of his generation.”

Flanagan was raised in Rosebery, a remote mining town in the island state of Tasmania. He left high school when he was 16, but he later earned a B.A. (1983) from the University of Tasmania. In 1984 he was …………………… a Rhodes scholarship to attend Worcester College, Oxford, where he earned a Masters of Letters.

His first novel, Death of a River Guide (1994), an account of a drowning man reflecting on his life and those of his ancestors, earned the 1996 Australian National Fiction Award. That work was followed by the highly acclaimed novel The Sound of One Hand Clapping (1997), a tale of the harsh life of a Slovenian immigrant family in Tasmania …………………….. the 20th century.

His novel Gould’s Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish (2001), about a 19th-century convict living in Tasmania, was awarded the 2002 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the best book as well as the Commonwealth’s Regional Prize for best book. The Unknown Terrorist (2006) was a modern-day thriller that took aim at media-driven hysteria, and Wanting (2008) was a complex 19th-century tale ……………………… in Tasmania and England involving an Aboriginal girl and novelist Charles Dickens.


2.) Sample

blame from including experience much consist with

Exhausted, Franklin worked briefly at Margaret McMillan’s crèche at Deptford, and ‘kept the wolf from the door’ as a cook at the Minerva Café, High Holborn, meanwhile ineffectually negotiating under male noms de plume …………………… publishers or dabbling in journalism. In June 1917 she joined as a voluntary worker the ‘American’ Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Service stationed at Ostrovo, Macedonia, and commanded by Dr. Agnes Bennett and Dr Mary De Garis, stimulating but the debilitating ……………………… for ‘Franky Doodle’, orderly. She returned unwell to London in February 1918, apparently not enticed to stay by the possibility of a paid post as a cook on a twelve-month contract. An inquiry about joining the Women’s Royal Air Force foreshadowed her enthusiasm for the air-based ………………………. of Australia.

Miles Franklin remained in London another eight years, punctuated by visits to Ireland in 1919 and 1926 and Australia, via America, in 1923-24. From 1919 she was employed as a secretary with the influential National Housing and Town Planning Council in Bloomsbury until wearied with male madness at the office in 1926. She had accumulated manuscripts, …………………. many plays, but post-war malaise in London plus renewed Australian contact and refreshing companions like the Victorians, Mary Fullerton, and yarner P. S. Watson, re-ordered her literary priorities. Her transition to nativism was symbolized by the completion of Prelude to Waking in December 1925 (published 1950, but the first work under her new pseudonym, ‘Brent of Bin Bin’).


3.) Sample

opposition decreasing between against mostly write increasing

Garner has ruthlessly exposed her own personal life. Born in Geelong, she was the eldest of six children in a white, working-class Lutheran family. Her father, whom she describes as “an endurance test that united his children in ……………………………. to him”, clashed often with Garner; he confiscated her birth control, obsessed over her correspondence with men and fought with her three husbands. Her mother, “an anxious creature, timid and appeasing”, provoked ………………….. impatience. Her marriages are deemed “crashes” (she has happily remained divorced for almost two decades).

Her fiction came in one burst: the debut Monkey Grip, based on her diaries, was published in 1977; two novellas in the 1980s (Honour & Other People’s Children); The Children’s Bach was deemed by one critic in 1984 to be one of four perfect short novels in English (alongside The Good Soldier, The Great Gatsby and The Sun Also Rises); and Cosmo Cosmolino in 1992. But that same year, Garner was asked by Time to cover the murder trial of a man who had killed a toddler. She would not ………………… a novel for another 16 years (and when The Spare Room was published in 2008, the main character was Helen, a writer in her 60s).

Helen Garner’s book on sexual harassment in a Melbourne University, The First Stone, had the impact of an avalanche in 1995. Infuriated by the decision of “cold-faced, punitive girls” to take groping claims against their college head to the police, Garner wrote to the accused man to lament the “appallingly destructive, priggish and pitiless way” he had been dealt with, a move that angered the students and their supporters. Throughout the book, Garner forgives the stupidity of fumbling blokes, in contrast to rapists (“If every bastard who’s ever laid a hand on us were dragged into court, the judicial system of the state would be clogged for years”), and warns …………………………….. lumping all sexual crimes under one umbrella. “The ability to discriminate must be maintained,” she writes. “Otherwise, all we are doing is ……………………… the injustice of the world.”


4.) Sample

read several a few short widely wanted get

Kate Grenville is one of Australia’s most …………………… read writers. Born in Sydney in 1950, Grenville grew up in a house filled with books. Inspired by her father’s gift for storytelling, she knew as a child that she ………………………… to be a writer. She majored in English Literature at the University of Sydney, primarily because it gave her the opportunity to ……………………… all day. After graduation, Grenville worked at Film Australia for five years before spending time in London and Paris.

Grenville wrote her first novel, which she calls unpublishable, while in Europe. After meeting ………………………….n             American writers in Paris, Grenville decided to pursue an M.A. in Creative Writing at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Grenville has stated that the writing program at the University of Colorado encouraged her to adopt a more adventurous writing style.

Upon her return to Australia, Grenville published her first literary work in 1984, a collection of ………………………… stories entitled The Bearded Ladies. Her first novel, Lilian’s Story, garnered critical attention. The Idea of Perfection won the Orange Prize in 1999. Grenville has published nine novels, several of which, like The Secret River, explore Australia’s past. Two of her novels – Lillian’s Story and Dreamhouse – have been made into films.


5.) Sample

hard navigate afraid praised handbags praised degree

Winton is ………………….. for the poetry of his prose, and he speaks in images, too, about when he first noticed that women’s lives were different. He would walk home at night and see women who were ……………………, tensing up at his presence and scrambling inside their ………………………

It’s like racism, he says: “If you’re a white middle-class person, racism isn’t a big part of your life. It’s …………………………. to detect because you’re never on the receiving end of it. You have to exercise a fair bit of moral imagination and a ……………………… of curiosity and research to pick it out.”

In the same way, many men can’t comprehend what is it like to …………………….. life as a woman. “We can talk about unexamined privilege but it’s often just at the simplest level,” Winton says. “You recognize that at a certain point your day’s half as hard as a lot of women’s days, regardless of class or whatever else.”

Winton uses the terminology of the moment: toxic masculinity, male privilege, domestic terrorism. Nothing he is saying is new and he knows that, and is sensitive to ……………………. term – “mansplaining”. The #MeToo phenomenon is full of complexity, pushback, and demands from some women for men to just shut up and listen.


Answers:

1.) who, known, awarded, during, set

2.) with, experience, defence, including

3.) opposition, mostly, write, against, increasing

4.) widely, wanted, read, several, short

5.) praised, afraid, handbags, hard, degree, navigate, another

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