Tim Winton recent updated reading fill blanks 105

Tim Winton recent updated reading fill blanks 105

# Tim Winton recent updated reading fill blanks 105

Read the following paragraph and choose the correct option to fill the gaps.

1.) Sample

supply successful several become both

Tim Winton, in full Timothy John Winton, (born August 4, 1960, Perth, Australia), Australian author of …………………… adult and children’s novels that evoke both the experience of life in and the landscape of his native country.

Winton had decided by age 10 to be a writer. He studied creative writing at the Western Australian Institute of Technology, but his down-to-earth hobbies—sports and recreational surfing, fishing, camping, and “hanging out” in the old whaling port of Albany—gave him an inexhaustible ……………………… of anecdotes that appealed initially to teenage readers. At age 21, he won The Australian/Vogel Literary Award, presented for the best-unpublished novel manuscript of an Australian author younger than 35, for his first novel, An Open Swimmer (1982).

He won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia’s most prestigious literary prize, for his second novel, Shallows (1984). More novels followed, and by the time his international bestseller The Riders (1995) was short-listed for the Booker Prize, Winton had …………………. Australia’s most ……………………. author since Nobel Prize laureate Patrick White. Among other novels by Winton are That Eye, the Sky (1986), Dirt Music (2001), and Breath (2008). He won the Miles Franklin Award three more times: for Cloudstreet (1992), Dirt Music (2002), and Breath(2009). He also wrote …………………… children’s books, including Lockie Leonard, Human Torpedo (1990), The Bugalugs Bum Thief (1991), and The Deep (1998).


2.) Sample

hard new knowledge opposing with promoted contributions

Franklin worked long and ……………………. for that, despite being ‘diverted by sociology’ and the pains of expatriatism, as unpublished writing indicates. Ironically she returned a writer at an unsustainable zenith, to draining, uneventful domesticity at Carlton.

Exulting in her native land, whilst ………………………. its sectarian politics (voting Social Credit in 1934), oppressive censorship and parochial pomposities, she devoted herself to Australian literature—for which she received King George V’s Silver Jubilee medal in 1935—and intellectual work. Spanning two literary generations, strengthened by the …………………………………. of American parallels, also by the welcome of sensitive women writers and the esteem of C.

Hartley Grattan, whose second tour in 1936 she helped to organize, she entered literary life ………………………. customary vigour: insofar as carefully controlled resources, a demanding mother who died in 1938 aged 88, and an expansive correspondence enabled, joining the Fellowship of Australian Writers (1933) and the Sydney P.E.N. Club (1935).

The largest hope faded first, with the demise of Percy Stephensen’s publishing projects, first mooted in London in 1932. Franklin thereafter …………………….. her own causes: Mary Fullerton’s poetry; Lawson; reminders of Joseph Furphy (1944) in painful collaboration with Kate Baker (an earlier essay on Furphy had won them the Prior Memorial prize in 1939); protection for ‘the last literary frontier’; and such promising young writers as Jean Devanny,.

Sumner Locke Elliott, Ian Mudie, David Martin and Ric Throssell. She supported ……………. literary journals, Meanjin and Southerly, the United Association of Women, Mary Booth’s nationalistic projects, and various fellowship schemes to nurture Australian writers, including Commonwealth Literary Fund lectures (though later doubting ‘the Government Stroke’). Indeed, her ………………………………. to Australian literary history and appreciation culminated in lectures delivered at the University of Western Australia (1950), published posthumously as Laughter, Not for a Cage (1956).


3.) Sample

want offence responses still involving leave

Twenty years on, in light of Weinstein and #MeToo, the book has new resonance and she is …………………… irritated by the reaction to it, mainly the accusations that she envied younger women. “I just think that is fucking pathetic,” she snaps. “I really do. I copped a hell of a blast over that book. It was horrible.” Does she still get letters? “Oh yes, but they’re nice now. Some of the ……………………….. at the time were poisonous.”

Whether we are now at the turning point women have been hoping for, she remains unsure. “Some days, I think this is just a million chickens coming home to roost, and I ………………….. to cheer. We are just so fed up of the constant pressure of men’s attention, it is just so boring. And other days I think: ‘Listen to them whingeing.’ Yes, some men need to be pushed off a cliff. Others are just twerps. There is a sense that there is no degree of the ……………….. But no one wants to know about that now, it is all a crime.”

As to the question of whether we should avoid films ………………………… the ever-growing list of Hollywood’s accused, “It’s an age-old problem: you can be a great artist and a complete bastard at the same time. Does that mean we can’t look at Picasso any more? Do we allow his work to affect us, or the works of any other arsehole who has done magnificent work? Where does it …………………… you? It is impoverishing, somehow. And sad.”


4.) Sample

two awarded process speaker awarded

Grenville has also written several books about the creative writing ……………………… that are used in writing programs at universities in Australia and abroad. In 2010, she was …………………….. an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of New South Wales. She is a highly sought after public ………………………. and gives several lectures a year.

Grenville is actively involved in the Indigenous Literacy Project, which advocates for greater literacy in English within isolated indigenous communities. The ILP raises money to buy and ship books to indigenous communities in an effort to ……………………….. their exposure to written English. The program is designed to improve the indigenous peoples’ socioeconomic status in Australia.

She is married to Bruce Petty, a political cartoonist, with whom she has …………………. children.


5.) Sample

tell most trying finish most

In 1991, as a young writer …………………….. to finish his first book, Richard Flanagan found himself faced with an offer he couldn’t refuse.

“I was offered $10,000 to write [an autobiography] in six weeks,” Flanagan told Guardian Australia. The book, ghostwritten by Flanagan, was Codename Iago: the autobiography of John Friedrich, one of Australia’s ……………….. notorious conmen. “I was labouring at the time, broke, and my wife was pregnant with twins, and we were in pretty desperate straits. So I took the job. In the third week, John Friedrich shot himself dead and I had to ……………………. the book.”

Friedrich had been just six days away from standing trial on ………………………. relating to the $296m fraud of the National Safety Council of Australia (NSCA) when he committed suicide, on 25 July 1991. The coroner found that “John” Friedrich was actually a German national named Friedrich Johann Hohenberger – though his widow would later …………… reporters that she was still “not sure” of his true identity.


Answers:

1.) both, supply, become, successful, several

2.) hard, opposing, knowledge, with, promoted, new, contributions

3.) still, responses, want, offence, involving, leave

4.) process, awarded, speaker, increase, two

5.) trying, most, finish, charges, tell


Like Our Facebook Page

Follow us on twitter link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*